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Posts for category: Dental Procedures

By Arthur S. Benson, D.D.S.
February 06, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: celebrity smiles   bonding  
ARoyalFix

So you’re tearing up the dance floor at a friend’s wedding, when all of a sudden one of your pals lands an accidental blow to your face — chipping out part of your front tooth, which lands right on the floorboards! Meanwhile, your wife (who is nine months pregnant) is expecting you home in one piece, and you may have to pose for a picture with the baby at any moment. What will you do now?

Take a tip from Prince William of England. According to the British tabloid The Daily Mail, the future king found himself in just this situation in 2013. His solution: Pay a late-night visit to a discreet dentist and get it fixed up — then stay calm and carry on!

Actually, dental emergencies of this type are fairly common. While nobody at the palace is saying exactly what was done for the damaged tooth, there are several ways to remedy this dental dilemma.

If the broken part is relatively small, chances are the tooth can be repaired by bonding with composite resin. In this process, tooth-colored material is used to replace the damaged, chipped or discolored region. Composite resin is a super-strong mixture of plastic and glass components that not only looks quite natural, but bonds tightly to the natural tooth structure. Best of all, the bonding procedure can usually be accomplished in just one visit to the dental office — there’s no lab work involved. And while it won’t last forever, a bonded tooth should hold up well for at least several years with only routine dental care.

If a larger piece of the tooth is broken off and recovered, it is sometimes possible to reattach it via bonding. However, for more serious damage — like a severely fractured or broken tooth — a crown (cap) may be required. In this restoration process, the entire visible portion of the tooth may be capped with a sturdy covering made of porcelain, gold, or porcelain fused to a gold metal alloy.

A crown restoration is more involved than bonding. It begins with making a 3-D model of the damaged tooth and its neighbors. From this model, a tooth replica will be fabricated by a skilled technician; it will match the existing teeth closely and fit into the bite perfectly. Next, the damaged tooth will be prepared, and the crown will be securely attached to it. Crown restorations are strong, lifelike and permanent.

Was the future king “crowned” — or was his tooth bonded? We may never know for sure. But it’s good to know that even if we’ll never be royals, we still have several options for fixing a damaged tooth. If you would like more information, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Repairing Chipped Teeth” and “Crowns and Bridgework.”

By Arthur S. Benson, D.D.S.
February 01, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Crowns  

One of the best ways to cover up teeth that have undergone restorative procedures is through crowns. Your family dentist at Akron, OH, Dr. Arthur Benson, can provide a dental crown to protect a damaged tooth or to improve its appearance.

How your family dentist can help you with crowns?

Crowns are cap-like porcelain dental restorations. To create them, your Akron family dentist takes an impression of your teeth and sends them to a lab where custom crowns are made just for you. In the meantime, you'll be given a temporary crown.

During restorative procedures, such as root canals, a significant amount of natural tooth is removed. This leaves the tooth susceptible to breakage, which is why a dental crown is placed over the tooth. The dental crown reinforces the tooth and allows it to withstand various degrees of pressure, meaning you can enjoy eating without the worry of ruining your tooth.

What does a crowns procedure consist of?

Here are some other uses that for dental crowns:

  • Attaching bridges
  • Covering dental implants
  • Covering an existing filling that may be dislocated
  • Covering stained or discolored teeth

How do you care for your crowns?

Dental hygiene is crucial for maintaining crowns and your overall oral health.

  • You need to brush twice a day, at least, and floss before bed. Make sure to give special attention to the area around your dental crown by holding your brush at a 40-degree angle to get hard-to-reach areas.
  • Maintain a healthy diet. Crowns can last for years, or more, so be sure to avoid biting into ice and restrict the consumption of sugary products, such as soda and candy.
  • Use a mouth guard, or splints, if you suffer from bruxism (teeth grinding) to increase the lifespan of your dental crowns.

Need help from your family dentist?

For more information on dental crowns and what they can do for you, contact family dentist Dr. Arthur Benson at Akron, OH, by calling (330) 666-8757 today!

By Arthur S. Benson, D.D.S.
December 18, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: gum disease   tooth decay  
StopRootCavitieswithPreventionandPromptTreatment

Tooth decay is a highly destructive dental disease, responsible along with periodontal (gum) disease for most adult tooth loss. And we become even more susceptible to it as we get older.

One form of decay that’s especially prominent among senior adults is a root cavity. Similar to a cavity in the crown (visible tooth), this form instead occurs at or below the gum line in the roots. They happen mainly because the roots have become exposed due to gum recession, a common consequence of periodontal (gum) disease and/or brushing too hard.

Exposed roots are extremely vulnerable to disease because they don’t have the benefit of protective enamel like the tooth crown, covered instead with a thin and less protective mineral-like material called cementum. Normally, that’s not a problem because the gums that would normally cover them offer the bulk of the protection. But with the gums receded, the roots must depend on the less-effective cementum for protection against disease.

Although we treat root cavities in a similar way to those in the crown by removing decayed structure and then filling them, there’s often an added difficulty in accessing them below the gum line. Because of its location we may need to surgically enter through the gums to reach the cavity. This can increase the effort and expense to treat them.

It’s best then to prevent them if at all possible. This means practicing daily brushing and flossing to remove bacterial plaque, the thin, built-up biofilm on teeth most responsible for both tooth decay and gum disease. You should also visit your dentist at least twice a year for professional cleanings and advanced prevention methods like topical fluoride to strengthen any at-risk teeth.

You should also seek immediate treatment at the first sign of gum disease to help prevent gum recession. Even if it has occurred, treating the overall disease could help renew gum attachment. We may also need to support tissue regeneration with grafting surgery.

Root cavities are a serious matter that could lead to tooth loss. But by practicing prevention and getting prompt treatment for any dental disease, you can stop them from destroying your smile.

If you would like more information on diagnosing and treating root cavities, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Root Cavities: Tooth Decay near the Gum Line Affects Many Older Adults.”

By Arthur S. Benson, D.D.S.
December 05, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures

Why you should choose dental crowns and bridges from your dentist in Akron, Ohio to rebuild your smile

If you are dealing with damaged or missing teeth, you need to discover dental crowns and bridges to give you back your smile. You may be wondering if this dental treatment is right for you. The truth is dental crowns and bridges are right for anyone who wants to restore their full smile and full chewing function. Get back to smiling and enjoying the foods you love. Dr. Arthur Benson in Akron, Ohio can make you want to smile again.

Dental crowns are right for you if you want to strengthen teeth that are damaged, broken, cracked, or worn down. Dental trauma, tooth decay, and the normal aging process can all work to damage your teeth. When you choose dental crowns, they will cover the entire visible surfaces of your teeth. When you chew or bite down, your teeth will be protected against damage.

Today’s dental crown materials including porcelain are lifelike and reflect light, just like tooth enamel. When you choose porcelain crowns, they can help your smile look dazzling, and help you look great.

If you are missing teeth, dental bridgework can fill in the spaces left by lost teeth. They can help restore your chewing function, which aids your digestion and your overall health. A dental bridge is cemented onto the teeth on both sides of the space. The bridge is composed of lifelike prosthetic teeth, called pontics.

Dental bridges are a permanent part of your smile. You don’t remove them, unlike partials. They are convenient and you brush and floss them just like your natural teeth.

You need to discover for yourself why dental crowns and bridges are right for you. Just pick up your phone and call Dr. Arthur Benson in Akron, Ohio to get started. Call now!

By Arthur S. Benson, D.D.S.
November 18, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
DontBreakItLikeBeckham

During his former career as a professional footballer (that's a soccer star to U.S. sports fans) David Beckham was known for his skill at “bending” a soccer ball. His ability to make the ball curve in mid-flight — to avoid a defender or score a goal — led scores of kids to try to “bend it like Beckham.” But just recently, while enjoying a vacation in Canada with his family, “Becks” tried snowboarding for the first time — and in the process, broke one of his front teeth.

Some fans worried that the missing tooth could be a “red card” for Beckham's current modeling career… but fortunately, he headed straight to the dental office as soon as he arrived back in England. Exactly what kind of treatment is needed for a broken tooth? It all depends where the break is and how badly the tooth is damaged.

For a minor crack or chip, cosmetic bonding may offer a quick and effective solution. In this procedure, a composite resin, in a color custom-made to match the tooth, is applied in liquid form and cured (hardened) with a special light. Several layers of bonding material can be applied to re-construct a larger area of missing tooth, and chips that have been saved can sometimes be reattached as well.

When more tooth structure is missing, dental veneers may be the preferred restorative option. Veneers are wafer-thin shells that are bonded to the front surface of the teeth. They can not only correct small chips or cracks, but can also improve the color, spacing, and shape of your teeth.

But if the damage exposes the soft inner pulp of the tooth, root canal treatment will be needed to save the tooth. In this procedure, the inflamed or infected pulp tissue is removed and the tooth sealed against re-infection; if a root canal is not done when needed, the tooth will have an increased risk for extraction in the future. Following a root canal, a tooth is often restored with a crown (cap), which can look good and function well for many years.

Sometimes, a tooth may be knocked completely out of its socket; or, a severely damaged tooth may need to be extracted (removed). In either situation, the best option for restoration is a dental implant. Here, a tiny screw-like device made of titanium metal is inserted into the jaw bone in a minor surgical procedure. Over time, it fuses with the living bone to form a solid anchorage. A lifelike crown is attached, which provides aesthetic appeal and full function for the replacement tooth.

So how's Beckham holding up? According to sources, “David is a trooper and didn't make a fuss. He took it all in his stride." Maybe next time he hits the slopes, he'll heed the advice of dental experts and wear a custom-made mouthguard…

If you have questions about restoring damaged teeth, please contact our office to schedule a consultation. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Trauma and Nerve Damage to Teeth” and “Children's Dental Concerns and Injuries.”